The world’s most famous photographers: Ephemera and photographs from a decade ago

The world was a different place in 2009.

It was a decade of global financial collapse, civil war and the creation of a new currency.

The financial crisis was triggered by a massive, speculative trading frenzy that brought a number of major global banks and corporations into disarray.

In the U.S., the financial crisis led to the worst recession since the Great Depression.

At the same time, the financial system that had been so powerful during the crisis had been crippled by a series of financial reforms.

The U.K., for example, was the only major industrialized country to see a drop in its GDP during the Great Recession, as unemployment soared and financial institutions, banks and governments became more fragile.

In contrast, China and Europe had experienced their own economic recoveries.

China was hit hard by the 2008 financial crisis, with the country’s gross domestic product dropping from a peak of 7.2% of GDP in 2006 to 3.7% in 2014.

Europe’s GDP dropped by more than 10% during the downturn.

Europe, like many other advanced economies, has seen its economy shrink.

In recent years, some European governments have proposed a series in a bid to rein in their economies.

The European Union recently proposed the introduction of a single currency, and the European Central Bank is considering the introduction as well.

In Japan, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe has promised to strengthen the countrys economic recovery and revive exports, as well as introduce a “one-size-fits-all” welfare system.

In Germany, the conservative Christian Democratic Union (CDU) has proposed a single euro currency.

At a recent party meeting, the head of Germany’s domestic intelligence agency, Peter Altmaier, warned that a single Euro would “deteriorate” the security of the European Union.

And Germany has been the target of numerous terrorist attacks.

Meanwhile, in Japan, Shinzo Abe’s government has announced plans to create a “digital nation” to serve as an alternative to the traditional welfare state.

In other words, the government is trying to build a kind of “digital Japan.”

Japan has a growing economy and a strong population.

However, in the last decade, its economic situation has been deteriorating, as the government has cut its social welfare state and increased its reliance on public subsidies to encourage business investment.

In a bid for economic growth, Japan has adopted policies that have left many people worse off.

For example, Japan is the world’s biggest importer of foreign goods, and exports are growing at a slow pace.

The country has also increased its consumption of electricity and other energy-related products, which in turn has contributed to a drop of around 10% in global carbon dioxide emissions.

In 2013, the Japanese government announced that it would reduce the country s carbon dioxide emission to the equivalent of that emitted by the U!

S.

over the same period.

The result was that Japan had to introduce a number more restrictions on carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases than the European country.

The latest measure to restrict these gases came in the form of a controversial plan called the Kyoto Protocol.

The Kyoto Protocol, also known as the Kyoto protocol, was adopted by the United Nations in 1997, and in 1997 was designed to prevent the global warming that was threatening the lives of millions of people in the developing world.

However to the dismay of the United States, the U !

S.

had already been in the process of developing and implementing the Protocol for over a decade.

This was due to its reliance upon fossil fuels.

According to the U .

S.

State Department, Japan was the second-largest importer and emitter of fossil fuels in the world, with nearly 40% of its exports coming from fossil fuels (compared to the next-most-emitting country, China, which accounted for just 5%).

In addition, Japan exports to China accounted for more than 30% of total global imports.

China, on the other hand, has been exporting more to the United Kingdom and other developing countries.

In 2014, the UK had the fifth largest carbon footprint in the European Economic Area (EEA) of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), with 1,851 metric tons of CO2 emissions.

This is more than Germany, which was the fourth-largest exporter of fossil fuel imports in the EEA in 2014, with 528 metric tons.

In addition to the Kyoto, there are also measures in place in many other countries to limit carbon dioxide.

In countries such as South Africa, the European Coal and Steel Community (ECSC) and South Korea, the number of CO₂ emissions limits has been increased.

In China, the country has introduced a number new measures that limit the emission of carbon dioxide, including a carbon tax, which is expected to hit the country at least $5,000 per year in 2022.

However the country still has one of the highest carbon footprints